• EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    Picture Source: RIIP

  • EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    Raising Awareness on Zoonoses in Communities

    Picture Source: OIE

  • EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    Sample Collection in Bats

    Picture Source: H de Nys-IRD

  • EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    Sample Collection in Bats

    Picture Source: H de Nys-IRD

  • EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    EBO-SURSY countries and project partners

    Picture Source: OIE

  • EBO-SURSY

    Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

    EVD Transmission Cycles

    Picture Source: CIRAD

 
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Capacity building and surveillance for Ebola Virus Disease - EBO-SURSY Project

ebola

Source: RIIP

 

The project aims to support the strengthening of early detection systems in wildlife in West and Central Africa, using a One Health approach to prevent Ebola virus disease (EVD) and emerging zoonotic disease outbreaks.

 

To fully understand the wildlife reservoirs of the Ebola virus, which have yet to be determined, surveillance systems for animal, environmental and human health are required. Sharing information from these multiple systems fosters a “One Health” approach. Improving surveillance protocols and community vigilance is essential to decrease the risk of transmission from animals to humans and effectively prevent and control EVD outbreaks as well as outbreaks of other zoonotic diseases

 

THE GOAL

 

The vision of the project is to better understand (if not determine) the natural cycle of the Ebola virus, while building capacity and strengthening wildlife surveillance systems at the local level. The main goal is to strengthen national and regional early disease detection systems in wildlife in West and Central Africa using a “One Health” approach to support countries to better detect, differentiate and prevent EVD outbreaks and other outbreaks caused by (re-)emerging zoonotic pathogens. Building sustainable community-based disease surveillance systems is a key component of the project

 

THE PROJECT

An agreement between the European Union (EU) and the OIE was signed in December 2016 and resulted in a five-year project named, “EBO-SURSY” (“Ebola surveillance systems”), This EU-funded project totals EUR 8 million and started in January 15th 2017.

 

Project Objectives

EBO-SURSY focuses on the following three objectives:

• Building institutional and “One Health” capacity through teaching and training

• Contributing to increasing community awareness of zoonotic diseases

• Reinforcing zoonotic disease surveillance protocols through field investigations and improved diagnostic assays

 

Priority Countries and Project partners

Ten priority countries are involved in EBO-SURSY.

 

EBO-SURSY countries and project partners

 

Following a joint conference organised by ECOWAS, FAO, OIE, WAHO and WHO in November 2016, some of the priority countries have embarked on a process to formally establish regional and national One Health platforms. Countries affected by EVD and other zoonoses (including neglected tropical diseases and vaccine preventable diseases) are continuously enhancing their human and animal health surveillance systems. These countries have requested and are participating in the OIE PVS Pathway, demonstrating their long-term commitment to building integrated health systems.

 

The EBO-SURSY project partners are composed of the project lead, the OIE, and three research organisations, CIRAD, IRD and Institut Pasteur. The project implementers have access to local, regional and global transdisciplinary and scientific networks and have well-established and longstanding relationships with local stakeholders in the target countries. Collectively, they bring decades of experience in the prevention and control of zoonoses, through the strengthening of veterinary services and practice in biomedical research as well as animal and public health, specific to infectious diseases.

 

OIE:The World Organisation for Animal Health places infectious diseases at the core of its mandate. The Organisation supports Veterinary Services in 181 Member Countries to be prepared to prevent and control the spread of animal-related diseases. The OIE’s Regional and Sub-Regional Representations, spanning five continents, effectively provide regionally customised services to its Members. All the countries participating in the project are Members of the OIE.

 

EBO-SURSY aligns with the OIE’s advocacy of the “One Health” concept as a collaborative, global approach towards understanding and acting upon risks at the human and animal health interface (including wildlife), as well as ecosystem health. Through this EU-funded project, the OIE is providing countries with external expertise to conduct epidemiological surveillance and is supporting countries’ involvement in assessments and training workshops to institutionalise national One Health methods.

 

CIRAD: The CIRAD is the French agricultural research and international cooperation organization working for the sustainable development of tropical and Mediterranean regions. It is a public industrial and commercial enterprise under the joint authority of the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is a targeted research institution and a recognised OIE Reference Laboratory.

 

CIRAD works hand-in-hand with local communities and the local environment, on complex, ever-changing issues, including food security, ecological intensification, emerging diseases and the future of agriculture in developing countries. CIRAD has ongoing projects in most of the targeted countries and together with local partners, is providing support in the areas of population genetics, identification of reservoir species, field and laboratory studies and the education of communities on zoonoses.

 

Sample collection in bats

facts on evd

Source: H de Nys-IRD

 

Institut Pasteur: The Institut Pasteur is a private, non-for-profit foundation. Its mission is to help, prevent and treat diseases, mainly those of infectious origin, through research, teaching, and public health initiatives. It has 120 years of experience in building local capacity, effectively utilising theoretical and practical courses, laboratory practice and field work. Institut Pasteur also relies on an international network of 33 institutes located in 26 countries worldwide, the Institut Pasteur International Network (RIIP).

 

Institut Pasteur was the first to diagnose the 2013-16 West-African EVD epidemic. In the context of the present project, teams of Institut Pasteur with its partners (RIIP) within the West and Central Africa region (Dakar, Abidjan, Yaounde, Conakry), will coordinate their efforts and collaborate to collect new samples from human, domestic and wild animals. Furthermore, Institut Pasteur’s experience will be drawn on to improve human resources for surveillance and research facilities in Western and Central Africa, in coordination with other initiatives such as the Pan African Coalition for Training in Research and Public Health (PACT).

 

IRD: The Institut de Recherche pour le Développement and their local partners, were involved in EVD outbreaks in Gabon, Congo, DRC and Guinea and have thus accumulated significant experience and played a major role in the training of scientists on the continent. They were also among the first to conduct studies on the role of wildlife in human EVD outbreaks.

 

IRD and its partners in West and Central Africa have been expanding their efforts in this field and have developed serological and molecular assays adapted to the screening of large sample sets. They also have begun to collect samples from wildlife, such as bats and bushmeat, to screen for EVD infection in over 20,000 existing samples. These samples are being provided for the purposes of the EBO-SURSY project. Further sampling and field and laboratory studies are being coordinated, diagnosis by molecular biology and serology is being performed and taxonomy of mammals (rodents and bats) is being conducted.

 

Sample collection in bats

facts on evd

Source: H de Nys-IRD

 

The EBO-SURSY project partners are working in synergy and collaborating with third parties, such as AU-IBAR, CDC, FAO, WHO and the World Bank; to build One Health capacities and strengthen surveillance systems for EVD and other zoonotic pathogens in the targeted countries

 

 

PROJECT ACTIVITIES

Based on OIE's internationally adopted standards, the OIE Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) Pathway will inform activities in the target countries. Every effort is being made to ensure synergistic progress in the implementation of field activities towards achieving the project’s objectives. Existing One Health mechanisms are being utilised to support constructive collaborations with local partners and other stakeholders in each target country.

 

The project partners endeavour to ensure that established national ethical norms are not compromised when collecting animal samples, and are using non-invasive methods when working with humans and animals. A metadatabase is being established and contains specific information about both human and animal samples collected over the course of the project. This will inform the development of surveillance protocols for EVD and other zoonotic diseases in the target countries.

 

Training and teaching sessions on sample collection, laboratory diagnostics, epidemiology, risk assessment, surveillance and communication are being conducted and informed by a One Health approach. The project partners are organising educational seminars on zoonotic diseases targeting schools, local markets, traditional healers, religious groups and public sector animal and human health personnel

 

EBO-SURSY Objectives and Activities

 

Project strcuture

Source: OIE

 

Communication between institutions and with communities is at the heart of this project. Communication needs to be accurate, regular and timely. Successes and challenges in collaborations among animal, human and environmental health sectors as well as national governments and implementing organisations are being shared in order to improve educational and zoonotic disease surveillance efforts.

 

 

Communication on zoonoses at community level aims to increase awareness of animal-to-human disease transmission and reduce ill-informed perceptions of the potential threat.

 

Existing communication tools and methodologies are being used for training and awareness raising activities. Additional communication materials are being developed to facilitate the implementation of the project, including the dissemination of scientific information on field investigations in local communitie

 

Raising Awareness on Zoonoses in Communities

Zoonoses in Communities

Source: OIE

 

SUSTAINIBILITY

 

The EBO-SURSY project embraces the One Health concept for disease prevention and control; this is the only sustainable approach. The project seeks to build on past achievements in this field so that countries are better prepared to monitor and control disease outbreaks once the project has terminated. The entire project is set with the vision of sustainability, in particular, through sharing results, involving concerned populations and teaching so that the trained persons will be able to continue the activities after the end of the project. Additional capacity building needs will be identified during the project

 

FACTS ON EVD

EVD is a re-emerging zoonotic disease that can be transmitted between animals and humans. At least 75% of emerging infectious diseases originate from animals.

 

EVD in animals

EVD affects humans and non-human primates such as chimpanzees and gorillas - two out of four species of African great apes are critically endangered. The virus can also infect other wildlife such as monkeys, antelopes and fruit bats. Pigs are the only species of livestock that are currently known to be susceptible to any Ebola virus.

 

EVD transmission

Fruit bats do not show clinical signs of infection when hosting the Ebola virus and so, certain species are considered to be natural hosts. Animals including apes, monkeys and antelopes that come in contact with these bats can be infected. EVD outbreaks in humans have been associated with infected apes and other sentinel animals, as well as the consumption of bush meat. The precise reservoir(s) for the disease is not known. Consequently, it is not possible to accurately determine the conditions for animal-human transmission and the dynamics of viral spread, which would enable early detection and control of future outbreaks.

 

EVD Transmission Cycles

virus cycle

Source: CIRAD

EVD outbreaks

Over 35 EVD outbreaks have been reported to date including, the first outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1976. The West Africa 2013-2016 EVD epidemic is the largest outbreak since the discovery of the virus. Multiple countries were affected, leading to devastating human and economic costs. The disease has a fatality rate in humans averaging at approximately 50%. It also affects non-human primates. Data suggests that in 2002-2003, the Zaire virus caused the death of about 5000 gorillas.

 

 

EU flag

The EBO-SURSY project
is funded by the
European Union.


 

 

 

PROJECT PARTNERS

• CIRAD

• Institut Pasteur

• IRD

• OIE

 

 

CONTACTS OIE

Sophie Muset (Paris)
Brice Lafia (Bamako)

Media requests: Catherine Bertrand-Ferrandis (Paris)

 

 

 
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